Creating a Community of Government Leaders
Committed to Equity and Economic Mobility
through High Quality Jobs


The Good Jobs
& Equity Project

ABOUT

The Results for America (RFA) Good Jobs & Equity Project was launched in 2022 to support state, local, and tribal government leaders in leveraging historic recovery investments from the American Rescue Plan (ARP) and Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA) to improve job quality and advance workforce equity.

The Good Jobs & Equity Project is focused on leveraging evidence-based practices and policies to create high-quality jobs by delivering timely subject matter expertise, hands-on learning, personal coaching, and ready-made templates that are all designed to equip leaders with the tools, knowledge, and skills to advance equitable outcomes for all.  

The first phase of the project will begin in June and run through November 2022.  It will include six virtual, interactive sessions designed to help jurisdictions develop a strategic foundation to lead long-term initiatives that can harness the power of evidence and data to improve equity and economic mobility for their communities over the long term. Topics include:

  • Strategy – Adopting a Job Quality framework and definition for your jurisdiction 
  • Equity – Understanding the connection between equity, stability and economic mobility
  • Measurement, Data, and Evidence – Adopting and evidence framework and leveraging evidence-based approaches to drive success
  • Leading by Example – Positioning your government agency to address internal processes that support job quality for employees and contractors
  • Action Planning – Operationalizing your strategy using your State and Local Fiscal Relief Funds (SLFRF) and/or Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA) funds

Sessions are action-oriented and will be paired with four hours of personalized, one-on-one subject matter expert support to assist agencies in implementing the learnings locally. By the end of November, selected communities will:

  • Deepen their understanding of the current and historical connection between job quality, equity, and discrimination in their local communities; 
  • Adopt a job quality definition, theory of change, and strategy to guide investments and interventions with an equity lens; 
  • Adopt an evidence framework through which job quality and equity efforts can thrive most successfully;
  • Understand the key levers for change in their agency: procurement, policy, empowerment, and HR practices;
  • Understand the evidence, case studies and universe of job quality interventions; 
  • Develop or advance an existing action plan to deploy federal funds to support job quality;
  • Access vetted tools, templates, and subject matter experts to execute and measure the impact of their action plans; 
  • Build a network of peers leading job quality efforts in their jurisdictions.

Out of this initial cohort, 10-12 communities will be invited to participate in a second phase from January 2023 to March 2024 to help implement action plans through additional technical assistance and learning content, vetted and tailored partner introductions, and other support to advance measurable, sustainable, and evidenced-based job quality interventions in their communities.

PARTICIPANTS

  • Baltimore County (MD)
    • The Office of Government Reform and Strategic Initiatives (GRSI)
  • City of Atlanta (GA)
    • Invest Atlanta
  • City of Boulder (CO)
    • City Manager’s Office of Economic Development
  • City of Chicago (IL)
    • Mayor’s Office
  • City of Durham (NC)
    • City Manager’s Office
  • City of New Orleans (LA)
    • Office of Workforce Development
  • City of Philadelphia (PA)
    • Mayor’s Office
  • City of Pueblo (CO)
    • Mayor’s Office
  • City of Racine (WI)
    • Mayor’s Office
  • City of Sunnyvale (CA)
    • NOVAWorks
  • City of Tulsa (OK)
    • Tulsa Authority for Economic Opportunity
  • Clark County (NV)
    • County Manager’s Office
  • Cook County (IL)
    • Chicago Cook Workforce Development Board
  • Hillsborough County (FL)
    • Department of Economic Development
  • King County (WA)
    • Department of Community and Human Services
  • Los Angeles County (CA)
    • Workforce Development, Aging and Community Services (WDACS)
  • State of Colorado
    • Colorado Workforce Development Council (CWDC)
  • State of Connecticut 
    • Office of Workforce Strategy
  • State of Ohio
    • Ohio Jobs & Family Services Office of Workforce Development
  • Washington County (OR)
    • Economic Development Program

FAQs

1. Why was the Good Jobs & Equity Project created? 

The American Rescue Plan (ARP) and the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA) provide important opportunities to reshape how government delivers services and outcomes that advance economic recovery, economic mobility, and job quality. In particular, these funds elevate a critical opportunity to apply an equity lens in how investments are allocated and evidence and data leveraged to create higher quality jobs in communities, particularly for historically underserved communities, and advance equitable outcomes for all. For example, of the $1.9 trillion in ARP federal stimulus funds, $350 billion in State and Local Fiscal Relief Funds (SLFRF) are is going directly to state, local, and tribal governments. 

Results for America (RFA) – which works across all levels of government to instill data and evidence-based decision- making – is supporting governments to make the most of this opportunity to reimagine and rebuild a more equitable society. The Good Jobs & Equity Project was created to support public sector leaders charged with deploying SLFRF and IIJA funds with the evidence, strategies, networks, technical assistance, and practical implementation tools to improve the quality of work in their communities for decades to come. 

2. What is the format and time commitment?

The Good Jobs & Equity Project will be delivered through monthly virtual meetings that will include presentations from leading national experts, facilitated group discussions, opportunities for break out sessions and peer-to-peer learning. Participants can expect a commitment of 5 hours per month, including a virtual session (90 minutes), pre-work (30-60 minutes) and follow up (1 hour of one-on-one subject matter expertise plus 1-2 hours of local agency work to begin implementing the tools discussed during the session). Project team members from each jurisdiction will have opportunities for other speaking and learning opportunities, as well as tailored introductions to partners or peers that can help with specific topics related to their projects. They will also have access to vetted tools, templates, sample contracts, and other resources to advance their projects.

3. What does RFA mean when it says “job quality?”

After an extensive literature review, RFA has developed an initial framework that outlines specific components of job quality, with elements and descriptions of each. An excerpt from this draft framework can be found here. Components of job quality include wages, benefits, scheduling, learning and career development, safety and security, voice and representation, environment and culture, and purpose and dignity. 

RFA’s initial framework is centered on equity, with a clear recognition that where high-quality jobs currently exist and who in our society can most easily secure high-quality jobs are fundamentally linked to historical and current discrimination within U.S. society and the economy. 

This framework will drive much of the curriculum and the projects developed and executed through the Good Jobs & Equity Project. Additionally, the communities participating in the Project will further inform RFA’s framework and the national discussion about job quality through additional case studies and evidence.

4. What topics will the curriculum cover?

The curriculum for the first phase of this program will focus on the foundational components of RFA’s job quality framework. This includes:

  • Strategy – Adopting a Job Quality framework and definition for your jurisdiction 
  • Equity – Understanding the connection between equity, stability and economic mobility
  • Measurement, Data, and Evidence – Adopting an evidence framework and leveraging evidence-based approaches to drive success
  • Leading by Example – Positioning your government agency to address internal processes that support job quality for employees and contractors
  • Action Planning – Operationalizing your strategy using your State and Local Fiscal Relief Funds (SLFRF) and/or Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act (IIJA) funds

Through the strategy and equity sessions, participants will adopt a Job Quality definition (leveraging leading frameworks) and lay out a high-level strategy for their local area that is oriented around equity, stability, and economic mobility. Through the measurement, data, and evidence session, participants will adopt an evidence framework and consider how to use evidenced- based -approaches as the foundation for their work, as well as examine what success looks like and how to collect the necessary data to track outputs, outcomes, and impact.  Through the leading by example session, participants will consider what they need internally to begin to operationalize their work – skill sets, communications approaches, procurement, evaluation, etc. and then begin to create action plans that outline the specific projects that will help them address job quality in their communities in the next year. 

The curriculum for the second phase of the program will focus on the four levers of change that enable government agencies to operationalize their strategy. These include:

  • Procurement – Working directly with employer partners, programs or populations through awards, purchases and contract management to define and prioritize evidence of effectiveness and job quality
  • HR Practices – Making shifts through internal processes, organizational practices, or priorities to change the way they recruit, hire, support, develop and advance talent
  • Policy – Using research, influence, and network to inspire policy change at the federal, state, or local level
  • Empowerment – Fostering and supporting change through worker and business education, awareness, and even organizational structure shifts

Any questions can be emailed to [email protected]